Outreach | MERG

Outreach

We undertake a range of outreach and public engagement activities.

Online activities

Play our online game - Plan a strategy to reduce mosquito numbers in order to control a disease problem.link to game

 

 

 

wooden cow - link to gameLearn a bit about population biology and the way we design epidemic models through this tutorial

Play our online game on controlling a foot and mouth disease epidemic.

 

 

 

 

Public events and exhibits

In late 2015, we spoke about our reseach published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface on bipolar disorder modelling to the Royal Society.

In early 2015, we spoke about our research at the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Divisional Party. This was followed up by Voices from Oxford and a video conversation with Professor Denis Noble on our research on evolutionary ecology and broader issues on the evolutionary biology of ageing.

 

exhibit at Big Bang Fair 2013

 

We were at the Big Bang Fair 2013 in London, 14-17 March 2013, with our "Insect Birth Control" exhibit. "The Big Bang is the largest celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths for young people in the UK."

 

 

 

exhibit at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 2012

 

 

 

We were at the 2012 Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, with our "Insect Birth Control" exhibit.  This exhibit was about the pioneering use of genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes to control diseases by reducing or eliminating the mosquito population.  There was an opportunity to learn more about the biology of the mosquitoes and talk to the scientists who created the GM insects. "The Summer Science Exhibition is an annual display of the most exciting cutting-edge science and technology in the UK."

 

We took part in Wow! How? in 2012, the annual family science fair held at the University of Oxford's Museum of Natural History and the Pitt Rivers Museum during National Science & Engineering Week, as part of the annual Oxfordshire Science Festival.  Our "Mosquito Challenge" included the dispersal of over 200 mosquitoes (cartoons, not real ones!) around the Museums for young ecologists to sample count and estimate the size of the population. Photo credit: Scott Billings, OUMC Volunteers.